Goonhavern Post Office; Goonhavern Stores & Bridge Stores

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This page shows the history of Goonhavern Post Office at the three different locations in the village over a hundred plus years; Goonhavern Stores (now demolished) & Bridge Stores.

Goonhavern Ye Olde Shoppe as the wording said over the shop entrance started (Mr Bill Chandler put the wording up in late 1965 or early 1966) life as a Stores in about 1892 with Mr & Mrs John Ford. John Ford had traveled all over the UK as a Mine Captain but returned to Goonhavern to retire from that life. Unfortunately he passed away in 1904 with a young family leaving Mrs Mary (Granny) Ford to run the business. By 1910 the Shop incorporated a Post Office. It continued as such until 1942 when Granny Ford died and widow Hilda Stephens her daughter moved the Post Office down the road to the property built by her husband Charlie Stephens “Charlens” in about 1943.

Goonhavern Ye Olde Shoppe now became the property of Oscar & Winnie Grigg (brother & sister) and they ran the shop as a shop only until mid 1960’s when after their death Mr & Mrs Reg & Betty Chandler bought the shop. This they ran until Easter 1971 when it was compulsory purchased by the council, so it could be demolished for a road widening project in 1971/72.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Once Widow Granny Ford died her daughter Hilda sold the shop to the Grigg’s and  a widow herself moved the Post Office to the other side of the road to the house (Charlens) built by her late husband Charles Stephens.

“Charlens” now a Post Office in 1943 remained a Post Office and Sorting Office with five postmen, inc one a lady (who used to cycle her round) covering Callestick, Penhallow, Ventongimps, Perranwell, Rose, Wheal Hope & Goonhavern.

Hilda Stephens lived there with her daughter Mary McCameron a widow and her grandson  Chester McCameron. Both Hilda & Mary ran the Post Office, until 1953, when Mary remarried. Mary & Joe Brooks moved down to Avalon just down the road and had a son.

In 1959 Hilda Stephens retired and moved down to Avalon with Mary’s first son Chester McCameron, and Mary, Joe & young Derek moved up to run and live in the Post Office. Hilda tragically died in 1961.

Mary again became a widow in 1965, and soon married Henry Rodda, who briefly incorporated a Butchers Shop within the Post Office building. This was the late 1960’s early 1970’s.  In 1978 Mary Rodda retired on ill health, and both stayed living in the village.

The Post Office was now taken over by Welshman Mr Jones. Not a friendly chap, perhaps his disability did not help his mood.

Finally Jim Gilbert took over from Mr Jones, and lived there until he retired in 2005 on ill health, and the building reverted back to a dwelling.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Part 7 – Bridge Stores:

Mr & Mrs Reg Chandler moved to a new premises built on the entrance to Carriage Parc (what was once the Railway cutting – the old railway bridge stonework can be seen by the verge on the edge of the car park into the park) on Bridge Road at Easter in 1971 after their Stores on the main road (ex Granny Ford-Winnie Grigg’s) was demolished by Cornwall County Council Highways (see Part 5).

After Betty Chandler various new owners took over the Stores only keeping it for a short time.

These owners were Barry and Beryl Oakley, Dennis and Pam Shepherd, Roy and Joan Stratton (-1987), Bob & Janice Kemp (1987-1995), David & Jean Allsop (1995-2001) and Peter & Maria Gartan (2001-2008).

In November 2006 under Peter & Maria Gartan it became a Stores and Post Office with the closure of the previous Post Office at “Charlens” when Mr Jim Gilbert retired. However it was short lived as by 2008 the Stores & Post Office ceased trading at a great loss to the village.

Luckily it was a brief closure, as on 30th March 2010 it reopened under the ownership of the “White family” Susan (Sue), Husband Ashley & Daughters Claire (now a Tonkin) & Michelle.

On 4th May 2010 the Village Post Office returned to the stores. Since then the business has thrived. In August 2013 work started on an extension of the Store and Post Office, and by the end of January 2014 the work was completed enlarging the store by at least a third to cater for increased business. It is now modern, spacious and well laid out. A new store room is being built in August 2016.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Shepherds Station – Treamble Mineral Line – Gravel Hill Tramway

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This page shows the history of the Shepherds Station to the Treamble Mineral Line to the Gravel Hill Tramway over the years.

Excerpts courtesy of The Cornwall Railway Society website – http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/

Shepherds Station.

Also well known and well documented was the removal of the rails from Shepherds Halt to Treamble, allegedly to help with the overseas rail lines during the First World War. The track bed was still used by the War Office as an alternative route to the Camp and a massively over engineered bridge was built over the track just to the east of the Halt.

As clouds darkened over Europe again in the 1920s, a decision was made to re-instate the Treamble branch, with a cover story that the mines in the area had re-opened. In reality, the War Office and the American War Department wanted somewhere in Cornwall to store munitions and other non-perishable supplies in preparation for an assault on the European mainland, should the ‘Peace in Our Time’ intuitive fail. Deerpark Mine, just to the south west of Rejerrah was chosen as the adits were still sound and relatively water free.

It was at this time the track plan at Shepherds Halt was altered to that seen in the popular railway publication and press. This re-connection of a direct link to Penhale Camp made it much easier to move troops and supplies, as trains could now run from London straight to the camp itself.

The fact that Shepherds was never an efficient or important station, as far as the GWR were concerned, can be seen by their reluctance to develop the site to their normal standard. There was no goods shed, the ‘cattle dock’ was built using old track rails rather than the usual fence post & rails, the platform itself was only wood, unlike the solid brick and stone constructions elsewhere on the line. The signal box was a short affair, placed on the platform rather than a separate building.

The War Office & The Camping Coach

With no road access to Deerpark Mine, goods to be moved out of the stores were re-loaded onto wagons and brought the few hundred yards back to Shepherds Station. The wagons were unloaded onto lorries out of sight of the station, the lorries then used the over bridge to join the main road network at Fiddlers Green.

The bridge also stretched across the wide yard to the south of the lines – this area was used for marshalling the lorries.

As the cattle dock was not really intended to be functional, much to the War Office’s dismay the GWR installed a camping coach in the siding. However, this proved to be of benefit as it was commandeered and used by the British and American military top brass to discuss the D-Day preparations.

Closures

Following the end of the war, the Treamble branch saw less and less military traffic and was closed in 1952. In 1963, the complete line from Chacewater to Tolcarne Junction was closed. In order to maintain the secrecy of the smaller Penhale Camp and the role it played, it was decided to remove all traces of Shepherds Station. This exercise was not completely successful, for the sharp eyed there are still some remnants to be found.

Courtesy of stubby47 on RMWeb. 

Treamble Mine

 

Treamble Branch – 3 miles 20 chains long
The line was an extension of the Treffry Tramway route from Tolcarne to East Wheal Rose the extension having been carried out by the Cornwall Minerals Railway in 1874. The branch was further extended to by a mile to Gravel Hill however this section closed in 1888.

The Minerals Branch line from Shepherds to Treamble had a chequered history. The mine closed in 1892 but the track was left in place.

In 1905 part of the route between a new Junction at Shepherds to Tolcarne was upgraded to form the Perranporth to Newquay section of the Chacewater to Perranporth branch which had opened in 1903.

In January 1917 it was taken up and shipped to France as part of the war effort. However, after the War there was an upturn in the minerals market and the rails were re-instated, the line being in use again by 1926.

Further prospecting took place at Treamble in the 1930’s & 1940’s but the revival of mining was short-lived. The branch was used by troop trains for Penhale Camp during World War 2 The line from Treamble to Shepherds closed 1st January 1952 and the track taken up in 1956.

The Treamble Mineral Line is always quoted as closing in 1956 ‘last revenue-earning traffic 1949’. The reason for this unusual terminology is that the line was used for the storage of wagons after 1949. Some are visible on one of the web site pictures.

N.B. It is understood that during WW2 a passenger train travelled the branch – this was a troop train. Also a witness remembers seeing a steam hauled demolition train on the branch during 1956.

 

Rejerrah Bridge  
The Treamble Mineral Line which ran from Shepherds to Treamble Mine had a chequered history – it was opened in 1873.  Closed and lifted w.e.f. 1st January 1917.  Relaid December 1925, reopened 16th Feb 1926.  The last revenue earning traffic was carried 8th August 1949. It was finally closed w.e.f.1st Jan 1952 The track was removed on 31st March 1956. (Rlys of Cornwall C.R. Clinker)

As a schoolboy my only sporting achievement was to run for my school at Cross Country. In those days a special bus laid on for school sports was a rare occurrence. I have clear memory of seeing a train on the Treamble Mineral Line from a Bridge on the original A375 at Rejerrah.

Until today I thought that this bridge must have disappeared under a road improvement scheme. However, looking along the old road using Google Street View I found that the old bridge is still there, somewhat chocked with rubbish.  Today 17th May 2014 the spot was revisited – the pictures are below. It is understood that the branch did see one passenger train – a troop train during WW2. Courtesy of Mr Keith Jenkin.

Gravel Hill Tramway

Mr Colin Burges provided much of the information and all of the photographs, it was only by his exploration in recent years we have gained more knowledge of this very short lived line.

​”Possibly the least photographed and documented railway outpost in Cornwall lies at the end of the former extension from Treamble serving the iron mines on Penhale Sands, abandoned in the late 19th century.

Much of the area was M.O.D. property attached to Penhale Camp. It is still private and the only permitted way to reach the terminus is by means of the coast path.

On a miserable day last summer (2016)  I ventured out from Holywell, walking twice the distance I would have done had I entered the camp. Last month (August 2017)  I left my bike in the car park on the far side of the holiday camp and went down to the wonderful expanse of Perran Sands”.

The Tramway extended from Gravel Hill Quarry out on the coast to the left to run up to the Treamble Terminus bottom right hand side of this map.

The Gravel Hill Mine end of the line. It split into two with one siding continuing on to the Mine engine house. The other line descended towards the mouth of the Mine by means of a rope worked incline. The incline was powered by a 11.5″ steam engine.           From Old Maps – OS 1880’s.

At Gravel Hill the lode was developed from a beach level adit (tunnel)  and also from shafts on the cliff top. The lode was also worked about 170 yards inland in an opencast pit called the ‘Big Iron Pit’. The Iron lode is crossed by a N-S lead lode worked a short distance to the north in Wheal Phoenix, and East Wheal Golden.
You can see ‘The Big Iron Pit, an evil looking working by clicking below –  ​https://www.aditnow.co.uk/Mines/Gravel-Hill-Mixed-Mine_5842/
Production
​Originally the mine was known as Penhale Iron Mine, Gravel Hill is known to have been at work before 1728, also in the 1840’s; and from 1874-82. Output figures are only available for the last working. When it produced about 8000 tons of iron ore, and 30 tons of zinc ore. In excess of 35,000 tons of ‘Spathose’ ore was extracted during the life of the mine.

My understanding is that the Gravel Hill extension was laid in 1888, but without parliamentary sanction (new railways required an act of parliament). Perhaps the Cornwall Mineral Railway was just chancing it. Records seem to agree that Gravel Hill Mine was abandoned in 1882, so was the railway a wild-west style attempt to revive the mine?

The OS 25 inch map for 1906 shows not the slightest trace of any railway to Gravel Hill. My guess is that the tracks lasted for no more than a year or two. It needs to be borne in mind that OS maps were not revised systematically – hence something which caught the surveyor’s eye in one year, may be gone in the next. Article courtesy of Mr Roy Hart.

The Treamble Mineral Line terminus – the branch from Shepherds comes in from the right. The Gravel Hill Tramway rose up alongside to make a trailing connection with the main branch. Colin Burges kindly advises us that –

“I hadn’t noticed before that the Treamble line’s mileage was originally measured from Fowey, the furthest reach of the C.M.R. Look for M.P. 32 on the first map. In later years, possibly after the line was re-laid, the mileage was measured from Shepherds”.

Notes re Colin’s photographs :- Photos of the Bridges – Railway and Stream – were taken where it says “Ford” on the map. The old M.o.D. gate is where you see “Spring” and “Weighing Machine” at the bend in the road. The road beyond the gate is not the Tramway but he is sure it joins the formation a little way along.

Creation of the Halt

In 1903 the GWR opened the line from Chacewater to Perranporth. The War Office pressed for the line to be extended to join with the Treamble branch, and Shepherds farm was chosen as the most inconspicuous spot. In order to help with the subterfuge, the original direct link to Treamble (& Penhale Camp) was re-aligned, and a simple halt with a kickback siding installed.

This simple arrangement allowed freight trains arriving from Truro to leave a wagon or two in the siding, from where they would be collected later by the small loco running the Treamble branch. Similarly, wagons could be left in the siding and collected by any passing Newquay/Par bound freight. These collections were usually timed to be between any scheduled passenger trains.

Shepherds Halt

 

Penhale Camp

In the late 1800s, the War Office saw the potential of establishing a large training camp on the dunes above Perranporth. The camp was split into two for operational and security reasons. The main part of the camp was positioned on the headland between Ligger Point and Penhale Point, the other smaller part of the camp was hidden in the valley to the southwest of Cubert.

Here, well away from prying eyes, troops were trained in all sorts of offensive combat, including demolition and sabotage. Whereas the Cornish population were usually keen to avoid any entanglement with government officials, especially the Excise Men, this ‘not seen anything’ attitude was encouraged by the War Office in order to keep the camp and its activities as quiet as possible. In exchange, the Government itself discouraged too much involvement of its officers with the locals’ nocturnal dealings. Even today, only the main part of the camp on the headland is marked on OS Maps of the area.

With the arrival of the railway first to St Newlyn East, and then later to Treamble, the War Office were able to move troops and supplies to and from Penhale Camp far easier and with even less fuss.

Miscellaneous locations

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This page shows various miscellaneous properties and items within the village over the years.

Cornerways:

Cornerways was situated on the crossroads in Goonhavern opposite Winnie Grigg’s shop. When the road was widened in the early 1970’s both Cornerways and Winnie Grigg’s shop were demolished. Today there is a bungalow on the site of Cornerways but it is set well back from the road and is smaller than the original.

Carnkief, Wheal Anna & Wheal Francis scenes:

Goonhavern Bible Christian – Methodist Chapel:

The Methodist (Bible Christian) Chapel (a listed building) was built in 1876 the same year as the Goonhavern School. The Sunday School was built in the 1860’s and was used as a Chapel until the main building was built. The last service to be held in the Chapel was on Sunday 15th October 2006.

Goonhavern Community Hall:

The Goonhavern Community Hall was built between 1950 & 1954. The land was purchased in about 1950 from Miss Lizzie Knight of Perranporth and the hall built by voluntary contributions opened in 1953, improvements were carried out in the 1960’s when the entrance was built on to the exterior instead of being inside the hall and the concrete floor was replaced with “wayrock”. The Hall celebrated 60 years in 2014.

Goonhavern Garden Centre:

Goonhavern Industrial Estate:

Goonhavern Snooker Club:

Goonhavern Institute was built for the community back in 1926 and has an engraved stone in the front wall dedicated to Mr William Henry Eplett. The front original building was built in 1926 and had an open hearth with a three quarter size snooker table before two extensions were added in later years.

Goonhavern Village scenes:

Near Halt Lane – Goonhavern Industrial Estate:

Public Conveniences:

The Public Conveniences were built at the Bridge Road entrance to Goonhavern Park some time after the park opened.

Reen Cross Farm:

Trebarthen Terrace:

On the 16th October 2006 a Lightning strike caused extensive damage to No3 & No4 Trebarthen Terrace.

Wheal Albert on Goonhavern Moors:

World in Miniature:

Memorials:

Churchtown Farm – Kernewek Restaurant/Pottery – Park View/Pottery Mews

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This page shows the history of Churchtown Farm – Kernewek Cottage Restaurant – Kernewek Pottery – Pottery Mews/Park View.

Back in my youth during the 1960’s there was a farm called Churchtown Farm once owned by Mr Joe Nicholls in the centre of our village, hard to visualise today.

Mr Nicholls kept a number of “North Devon cattle”. Mr Nicholls passed away in 1965, and some time afterwards the Farmhouse was converted into a Restaurant (The Kernewek Cottage Restaurant) but the outbuildings remained on site.

After a few years this closed and the Restaurant was converted into a dwelling. Mr & Mrs Reg Foster moved there, and built Fosters Pottery. The outbuildings still remained. There were other brothers that owned separate Fosters Potteries, one at Scorrier and one in Redruth.

In 1995 a fire in the Kiln Building destroyed the potteries ability to make pottery on site and it was then solely used as a Pottery Factory Shop. Eventually closing down completely in 2005.

Mr Foster then started a housing development on the site including the outbuildings which were also converted. The development took a number of years to complete, the old Kiln building gone by 2009,  and the last dwelling built in 2014. This site is now known as Potters Mews and Park View.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Goonhavern CP School – Renovation Project 2000-2003

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Phase 1 of the School Renovation Project started by Headmaster Mr Roger Arend breaking ground on 13th July 2000 to commence work on site.

Photos of Phase 1 – Start Date 21st July 2000:

Photos of Phase 2 – Start Date June 2002:

Photos of Phase 3 – Start Date Summer 2003:

Photos of School Fete 2010 Showing how school looks 7 years on:

Perranwell Viaduct – Goonhavern Halt – Shepherds Station

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This page shows the history of Perranwell Viaduct to Goonhavern Halt to  Shepherds Station over the years.

Excerpts courtesy of The Cornwall Railway Society website – http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/

Truro – Newquay Branch line

So ended the last run over the line originally constructed in two sections. The first section of about eight miles to Perranporth, was opened on July 6, 1903. The contractor was Arthur Carkeek, who was knighted in 1916. Hundreds of men, without mechanical aids, cut their way through high mounds of stone and rubble, shovelled thousands of tons of rocks into gullies to make embankments, built some thirty bridges and the fine five arch viaduct near Goonbell.

The 10-mile second section from Perranporth to Newquay was completed on January 2, 1905, well behind schedule, as it had been hoped the line would be in use for holidaymakers in the summer of 1904, but the engineers had met considerable difficulty. It was opened on 14th August 1905. At Goonhavern, sand instead of stone was found, and there were many falls.

Ripping up of Newquay line

The final blow came when on 2nd January 1964 when there was a short item in the ‘West Briton’. The final episode in the 60 year history of the Chacewater – Newquay line was begun yesterday, when a start was made on the removal of the rails. A train drawing five trucks went from Chacewater to Shepherds, and this will continue once a week until the rails are removed back to Chacewater.

Shepherds Halt – the true story of Shepherds Station

Recent research into the history of Shepherds Station has unearthed a hitherto unknown and quite interesting story. What most books would lead you to believe is mostly true, but there are sinister undertones involving the War Office, and the British and American Militaries.

 Shepherds Station

Shepherds was a sizeable station, one of only three on the branch (Chacewater – Newquay line), built on traditional lines with a weighbridge, passing loop, separate “up” and “down” platforms and a stationmaster.

The Passenger Service

In the early days of the branch line, passengers were conveyed between Newquay and Chacewater by Steam Railcars but these were not popular and were soon replaced by steam locomotives hauling conventional carriages. To start with, the service was planned to meet the anticipated travelling requirements of potential passengers and in 1905 six trains operated each way between Chacewater and Newquay with one extra train on Saturdays only and no trains on Sundays. lt appears that the running of trains on a Sunday was never contemplated, probably because of the strong Methodist following in the area.

Travel to Truro by train was now cheaper than going via Par and quicker,  all be it still by a roundabout route. For example, the ordinary return fare from Newquay to Truro was 2s 6d as opposed to 6s 8d via Par. As traffic increased so the service became more frequent and was eight trains in each direction in 1927 and twelve in 1938 but dropped back to eleven in 1958. From 1962, diesels took over all services. Passenger traffic was light but constant during the winter months and usually heavy during the summer. Beach Halt at Perranporth, opened in July 1931, was the last halt to be built on the line and was popular with those wanting a day out on Perranporth Beach.  For those wanting a Railside holiday, there was a camping coach in a siding at Shepherds which was generally well booked.

By the 1960s growth in the ownership and use of cars had significantly reduced the number of passengers travelling by public transport. The Government was looking to reduce subsidies and set in motion a review of railway operations. The so-called “Beeching Plan” was the outcome and proposed the closure of many branch lines where annual expenditure exceeded income. The Chacewater to Newquay branch came into this category despite the fact that, even in winter, it was reckoned that 600 passengers made return journeys daily, and that the line carried a total in excess of 250,000 annually. The economics of operation were considered to be the key factor and receipts only covered about two-thirds of the annual expenditure of £38,000 Economies were made, one being to make Mr. Badcock, the stationmaster at Shepherds, redundant and pass control to the stationmaster at Perranporth, but income never quite matched expenditure. The line always remained “rural” and, in winter, it was part of the guard‘s duty to set up and light the oil lamps at the halts before it became dark and then, on the last train of the day, to switch them off and put them on board the train.

Excerpts from the book on St Newlyn East & Surrounding area.

Perranwell:

Goonhavern Halt:

Shepherds Station:

Goonhavern – Individuals of the Past

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This page shows just some of the many Individual Characters of the Village of Goonhavern over the past hundred and fifty years .

Earlier than 1900

Period 1900-1909

Period 1910-1919

Period 1920-1929

Period 1930-1939

Period 1940-1949

Period 1950-1959

Listen to a track played by Goonhavern Banjo Band.

Listen to a vocal track by Glen Pedlar singing with Goonhavern Banjo Band accompanied by his Daughter Carol.

Listen to Rita Jacka playing a Banjo solo.

Period 1960-1969

Period 1970-1979

Period 1980-1989

Period 1990-1999

Period 2000-2009

Period 2010 – todate

2 Goonhavern Banjo Band tracks are from a live concert courtesy of Mr John Bidwell & the 3rd is from a Radio Cornwall broadcast featuring a Rita Jacka solo.

Goonhavern C.P.School

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This page shows the history of Goonhavern County Primary School over 140 years (1876-2016).

Goonhavern County Primary School opened on the 17th October 1876 and its first Headmaster was Mr William Tresidder who lived at the School House with his wife and young family. William was born in Feock but married a local girl Elizabeth Trebilcock and raised a family. Mr William Tresidder was Headmaster until he retired on April 20th 1916 after 40 years at the age of 65 years. During this period his son John and daughters Olga and Martha were also teachers at the school.

After Mr William Tresidder retired Mr Hugh Peters took over on 1st May 1916. His tenure was cut short as on the 15th July 1916 he left to join His Majesty’s Forces in the 11th Pioneer Battalion during World War 1.

On September 11th 1916 Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast took over as a temporary headmaster, the position made permanent in 1919. Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast, his wife Ada and only son Leslie lived at the School House. Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast was Headmaster until he retired at the age of 60 years on 5th January 1941.

After Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast retired Mr Leslie Crabb took over as Headmaster on 6th January 1941. Mr Crabb was appointed as a teacher in May 1930, before leaving on 31st December 1932 to be appointed Headmaster at St Gennys Bude. Mr Leslie Crabb, his wife Doreen also a teacher and children Angela & David lived at the School House. Mr Leslie Crabb stayed until leaving suddenly under a cloud on 1st May 1950.

On 2nd May 1950 a Mr C Iveson (Supply Teacher) took over as the temporary Headmaster until a new one was appointed.

Mr William (Bill) Curnow started as Headmaster on 7th September 1950, with his wife working in the office. Mr William Curnow, his wife and daughter Marilyn lived at the School House. Mr & Mrs Curnow retired in July 1974 and they moved to a bungalow on the Reen Cross Road, Goonhavern until his death.

In September 1974 popular Mr Tom Delbridge took over as Headmaster and carried on till his retirement in July 1993. Mr Delbridge was instrumental in organizing the School Sports Day and School Fete, which on those days you could hear his voice booming out across the village with his PA System.

After Mr Tom Delbridge retired Mr Roger Arend arrived in September 1993 and saw a modernisation of the school between 2000-2003, something that had been talked about for 25 years before.

In 2000 major works commenced over a four year period to upgrade the school and completely refurbish the school inside and out with additional permanent buildings being built to replace the old Elliott Classrooms that had been there for nearly 50 years. Mr Arend left in December 2008.

After Mr Arend was Mr Craig Hayes who started at Goonhavern in January 2009 and finished in July 2017.

The latest Headmaster Mr Mark Lloyd  started in September 2017.

©2018 Derek Brooks

Photographs of Rejerrah Village, Surrounding Hamlets and its Residents

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This page shows just some of the many Places and Individual Characters of the Village of Rejerrah over the past hundred and fifty years .

 

Central Stores; Masters Garage & The Gables

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This page shows the history of Central Stores; Masters Garage  & Mr Henry Richards/Mr Raymond Ellery Carpenters Shop over the years.

Central Stores:

In 1881 although not named, there was a James Buddle, his wife Ann & son John who ran a grocers shop and carriers which seems to be what we know as Central Stores. They are still listed there in 1893 the last mention of them.

Central Stores had been established for over a century when a newspaper article in “Town and Country News” appeared on December 30th 1932. Then the present Central Stores had been recently rebuilt, but had only been controlled by the then proprietress Miss Elsie K. Hollway for the past few years.

Originally a Grocery store, it widened its scope until today (1932) there are only a few essentials that were not stocked. Miss Hollway adopted the policy of stocking everything that was asked for. Thus if an article is asked for and not stocked, Miss Hollway obtained it specially and in future kept a small stock against future orders. Thus the scope of her stores was ever increasing. Hence the nickname “The Harrods of cornwall” was born. There were many farms in the district and most of the farmers and residents supported Central Stores and obtained as many of their requirements as possible.

Groceries constituted the bulk of the stores sales and a very large and varied stock of all the leading proprietary lines was covered. Next in importance was her Drapery Goods. The stock held is also very varied and taking everything into consideration particularly attractive. Confectionery, Newspapers and innumerable other articles played a leading part.

Behind the store was a field which was let as a camping site to Scouts and others, tents, furniture and utensils being supplied by Miss Hollway. Miss Hollway was still there in 1939.

It continued as the village stores with various owners including Stephen Clark during the war, his Mother in Law, Muriel ran it, Arthur & Elsie Smith in the from 1969, and finally Johnny Morris & his wife Betty sold it in 1997.

It was purchased then by Jim Harvey and converted into a private dwelling with his Barbers Shop in the side building adjacent to the dwelling. It is still that way today.

©2016 Derek Brooks

“Fredliz (Masters) Garage was owned by Frederick (Fred) & Elizabeth (Lizzie) Masters, It served petrol and carried out car maintenance. They owned the garage in 1939 and after Fred died in 1941, widow Lizzie ran the garage for many years, then later with son Philip when he was old enough in the mid 1950’s. Finally it was closed and sold in 1995 and converted into a dwelling.

©2016 Derek Brooks

The Gables:

Henry Richard’s wife ran “The Gables” for Bed & Breakfast in the 1930’s.

In my youth from the 1960’s through to the 1980’s it was owned by Mr Ron Richards and his family.

The Gables changed drastically and became a Residential Home for The Elderly and during 1998-2012 predominantly catering for Physical & Learning difficulties.

It has now been sold, and has been turned into residential accommodation (flats).

The Carpenter’s Shop:

The Carpenter’s shop was situated to the left of the entrance to the Gables, and had various occupants. There are mentions of Carpenters Edward Coombe and William Nicholls being Carpenters in 1901 & 1911 but I cannot confirm it was this location.

However after this we do know that Henry Richards had his Carpenters Shop there in the 30’s & 40’s. In the days of little cars, he used to make wooden wheels for the transport of the day, and also made coffins. They used to say early surf boards were actually coffin lids.

Sometime after Henry Richards, Perranwell resident Raymond Ellery had the Carpenter’s Shop this was in the 1950’s. I believe he left this location in 1980 when the Gables was sold, and then he moved and had his Carpenter’s Shop at Perranwell in the old Wooden building that originally came from Noble’s Explosives Factory at Cligga.

Raymond was the village postman in the mornings during the 70’s and a Carpenter & Undertaker the rest of the day.

Finally, the building was used as a Fishing Tackle Shop probably in the early 2000’s.

The Shop:

Details on this is more sketchy, on the opposite side of the entrance to “The Gables” was another small building. It was occupied at the same time as Henry Richards had his Carpenters Shop, both buildings looking similar in old photos.

©2016 Derek Brooks