Mining in our Area

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of Mining in our local area, much sadly now long gone but still there are features still visible today if you look.

Some pictures are of poor quality but better than not having them. Hope you agree.

Wheal Goshen Mine: (No Photos)

Wheal Goshen was a small lead mine near Goshen farm, just west of Wheal Mithian across the parish boundary. On Brenton’s map of the Chiverton Mining District, dated 1869, this mine is indicated as George the Fourth Mine. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Spargo, T. (1865): The Mines of Cornwall and Devon: Statistics and Observations. Victoria Press (London), 188 pp.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 493 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint, p. xlviii).
A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48SW.

Penhallow Mine: (No photos or info)

Perran Wheal George Mine: (No photos)

Perran Wheal George was a small copper and lead mine, variously known as Perran Wheal George, Wheal St George, and Perran Wheal Alfred. It was first known around 1819 under the name of Perran Wheal Prosper when it was working a copper lode from shallow levels, and renamed when it was restarted in 1851.

The sett includes two ENE-trending copper lodes, about 170 yards apart, and a lead lode. The old workings from the first period of activity are on the southerly copper lode. They can be traced at the surface, but are not shown on later mine plans which only indicate workings on the northerly copper lode. The latter was opened up by four shafts, the burrows of which can still be identified in the fields adjacent to Higher Penwartha farm. There are no records of output. Note: Not to be confused with the Perran Great St George Mine near Perranporth. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Davies, T. (1877) VI.— Notes on vauquelinite from Scotland, and cantonite from Cornwall. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 1, n° 4, 112-114.
Dines, H.G. (1956) The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 492 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).
 

Lambriggan Mine: (No photos)

An unique example of a mine ore pile left standing at surface. One of very few sites of its kind in Cornwall. (Courtesy of aditnow.co.uk web site)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 493 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).
 

Wheal Golla Mine: (No photos or info)

Perran Wheal Vyvyan Mine: (No photos or info)

Trevellance Mine, Bolingey: (No photos or info)

Perran Wheal Jane Mine: (No photos or info)

South Wheal Leisure Mine: (No photos)

South Wheal Leisure was a small copper mine, also known as Truro Consols, on the western slopes of Penwartha Coombe, southwest of Bolingey. In 1871, it was worked under the name of Perran Wheal Kitty, and in 1852, it was amalgamated with nearby Perran Wheal Jane under the name of Perran Wheal Jane Consols.

The mine worked on two lodes, which carried copper ores and pyrite. The northern lode also carried some sphalerite. They were opened up by an adit along the southern lode, and by a shallow shaft. In 1911, the property was tried for tin, and 3.5 tons of black tin were raised while development works were undertaken. Another trial in 1930 was not successful. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 491-492 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).

New Wheal Leisure Mine: (No photos)

New Wheal Leisure was small zinc and copper mine, working two EW-trending lodes, called North Lode and South Lode, below Bolingey village. South Lode was opened up by a shaft, while North Lode was accessed by an adit which commenced in the alluvial tract east of the village and followed the lode westwards for 66 fms, then turned south and connected with the workings on South Lode. The grid reference marks the site of the shaft, of which a large overgrown burrow remains in the angle between Hendrawna Lane and Chapel Hill Road. Another large dump is located a little further east, on the opposite side of Hendrawna Lane. The dressing floors and mill noted by Hamilton Jenkin in 1956 have meanwhile been removed.

The mine raised small quantities of lead and copper ores, but sphalerite was the predominant ore mineral in the lodes. During its last period of activity, from 1907 until 1911, it produced 1,624 tons of 37% zinc ore. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site) 

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 491.

Reen Wollas Mine:

Reen Wollas Mine was a small and old mine, with which Hamilton Jenkin associates two shafts that were located in a field just west of Lower Reen hamlet. Today, there are no traces of the workings left. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.
 

East Wheal Leisure Mine:

East Wheal Leisure Mine in 1833, 1851 and 1852, the mine produced 700 tons of 5% copper ore. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference: 

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 450-451.

Wheal Friendship Mine: (No photos)

Wheal Friendship, also known as Wheal Blandford, worked in a small way on two ENE-trending lodes crossing the valley of Perrancoombe northeast of Anchor hamlet. The northerly lode was tried by two adits on either side of the valley, the southerly by a line of surface workings along its strike. Dines also notes several lines of surface pits in N-S directions that were probably dug in search for the lodes, but these cannot now be identified. The nature of the lodes is not known, but they are believed to have been carrying tin and copper ores. There also are no records of output.

The sett included another small mine, variously known as Treslow Mine or Polglaze Mine, which was located further west, across the B3285 road, and has now disappeared below the airfield. The grid reference is arbitrarily centered in the western part of the Wheal Friendship sett. There are no traces of the mine workings left at surface. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 492.

Susan Tregay’s Droke: (No photos)

A name given to a weathered ditch that was used to carry the water pumped from Devonshire shaft of Perran Great St George Mine down to the stream at Perran Coombe. According to Hamilton Jenkin, this ditch is probably an old opencast working in a stanniferous elvan. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site) 

Reference:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.

Perran United Mine: (No photos or info)

Wheal Leisure Mine: (No photos or info)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 452.
Reid, C., Scrivenor, J.B., Flett, J.S., Pollard, W., and MacAlister, D.A. (1906): The Geology of the Country near Newquay. HMSO Publications (London), 131 pp. [on page 97, listed under “Great St George and Wheal Leisure”, the authors give a short account on Calloway’s Lode and Kernick’s Lode. The latter has been worked by Wheal Leisure. It is the same lode as Kernick’s South Lode of Wheal Perran (Dines, 1956)]

 

Wheal Prudence Mine:

Wheal Prudence was an old copper mine located on the cliffs to the south and south-west of Hanover Cove. Wheal Prudence forms an amalgamation of the small and older Wheal Jacka, Wheal Cock and Wheal Meadow mines, although the precise locations of these old setts cannot now be determined.

The base of the 70-inch pumping engine house on New Engine Shaft still survives although the shaft itself is choked at the surface. The engine house survived in good condition until its destruction during the construction of the Second World War airfield at the site.

Other shafts can still be seen close to the cliff edge and on the coastal slope.

There are two principal lodes recorded being North (or Prudence) Lode and South (or New) Lode, there are also references to a Wheal Cock Lode and a Caunter Copper Lode.

Records indicate a production of some 7000 tons of copper ore between 1821 and 1865, with 55 tons of tin produced in 1825-6 and a further 1 ton of tin in 1847-9. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site) 

References:

Kingsbury, A.W.G. and Hartley, J. (1956) Atacamite from Cumberland and Cornwall. Mineralogical Magazine, 31(235), 349-350.
Reid, C., Scrivenor, J.B., Flett, J.S., Pollard, W., and MacAlister, D.A. (1906) The geology of the country near Newquay. Printed for HM Stationery Off. by Wyman & Sons, Limited.
 

Island Shaft – Wheal Prudence Mine:

Island Shaft was an isolated working of Wheal Prudence on a rock pillar that is detached from the cliff. A wooden bridge once connected the workings to the cliff edge. In the cliff face, erosion and subsequent collapses have revealed the old workings. What looks like trials at the foor of the cliff (south of Hanover Cove) are really erosion caves (Henwood, 1843). (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Henwood, W.J. (1843): On the Metalliferous Deposits of Cornwall and Devon. Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall 5, 1-386.

Hanover Cove Mine:

Hanover Cove a small cove, earlier known as Vugga Hayle, which owes its name to the Falmouth packet ship “Hanover” that wrecked there on 2 Dec 1784. Rock falls on the cliff south of the cove have exposed part of the workings of Wheal Prudence, whose shafts are located on the cliff egde.

To access the cove, which is located about 1/2 a mile south of Cligga Head, one has to walk around the corner of the cliff at the south end of the beach adjoining Cligga Head. This is only possible at lowest tide, and when the sea is calm.

Note:
The coastal stretch between Cligga Head and the cliff that separates the beach from Hanover Cove forms part of the Cligga Head locality. The mineralization of the lodes that crop out along the beach is the same or at least similar to that found in the lodes at Cligga Head and in the vicinity of Cligga mine. Though, Hanover Cove is a separate locality with a different mineralization. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Ansermet, S. (2007): Kupfermineralien von der Hanover Cove am Cligga Head, Cornwall. Lapis 32(2), 25-26, 50. (in German)

Good Fortune Mine: (No photos or info)

Cligga Head:

Granite-related mineralization. Cligga Head granite is intruded in Devonian metasediments. The granite is cut by greisens-bordered NE vein-system. The greisens are cored by Sn-W-As-quartz veins. Sulfide mineralization occurs in fractures cross-cutting Sn-W-As-quartz veins. The granite is rimmed by a tourmalinite alteration aureole. Hydrothermal activity : 350-400°C, 0.7 (boiling)-1.7 kb. Na-K-Fe-Ca chloride brines rich in B, F, SO4 (degassing of magmatic volatiles).

This locality includes – Cligga Mine, which is listed as a sub- locality – the exposure of the greisen-sheet vein stockworks (another SSSI, so keep hammers in bags!), located just below the 1940s mine works on the top of the cliff, and – the beach, with numerous vein outcrops and scattered material from cliff falls.

The beach at the entrance to the mine yields arsenopyrite, cassiterite, small scorodites and wolframite without having to look too hard. More minerals are found on the beach around the cliff past the mine entrance, which extends about 1/2 mile farther south. Around the cliff at the southern end of the beach is Hanover Cove (see separate entry), which can be accessed only at lowest tide. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

 

References:

Ansermet S. (2007) Kupfermineralien von der Hanover Cove am Cligga Head, Cornwall. Lapis 32(2), 25-26 (in German). [unlike the title suggests, the paper also deals with Cligga Head]
Kingsbury, A.W.G. (1958) Two beryllium minerals new to Britain: euclase and herderite. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 31, n° 240, 815-817.
Kissin, S.A. and Owens, D.R. (1989) The relatives of stannite in the light of new data. Canadian Mineralogist 27, 673-688.
Moore, F. and Howie, R.A. (1984) Tin-Bearing Sulphides from St Michael’s Mount and Cligga Head, Cornwall. Mineralogical Magazine 48, 389-396.
Russell, A. (1911) On the occurrence of phenacite in Cornwall. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 16, n° 73, 55-62.
Russell, A. (1924) Topaz from Cornwall, with an account of its localities. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 20, n° 106, 221-236.
Smith, M., Banks, D.A., Yardley, B.W.D., and Boyce, A. (1996) Fluid inclusion and stable isotope constraints on the genesis of the Cligga Head Sn-W deposit, S.W. England. European Journal of Mineralogy 8, 961-974.
Weiß, S., Merry, M., and Ansermet, S. (2017) Neufunde aus Cornwall: Cannonit, Arthurit, Auriacusit. Lapis, 42 (1), 20-23; 62 (in German).

 

Cligga Mine:

Cligga Mine workings are located on the cliff edge at Cligga Head. Just northeast of the greisen-sheet vein stockworks, and on the same level as those, is an extensive dump packed full of arsenopyrite, wolframite, iron & copper minerals. Note, however, that some of these dumps are from the Perran Great St George and Good Fortune mines, as are the workings further inland, west and north of the airfield that is now used by a glider club.

The mine itself can be accessed through the adit at beach level. The frequent rockslides have exposed some of the mine workings in the cliff face; they can be reached by climbing up inside the mine from adit level. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Kissin, S.A. and Owens, D.R. (1989) The relatives of stannite in the light of new data. Canadian Mineralogist, 27, 673-688.
Moulding, D., Hooper, J., and Green, D.I. (2008) Stolzite from Penberthy Croft Mine, St Hilary, Cornwall. Journal of the Russell Society, 11, 88-90. (referring to a find of stolzite at Cligga Mine.)

 

Perran St George Mine:

Perran St George shafts are situated to the east of Cligga Head. An ancient mine originally worked for tin, Great St George Mine was first mentioned in 1589. Mining for copper in the area was occurring in the late 18th C, between 1800-04, Great St George Mine raised 1507 tons of copper ore (149 tons copper metal), selling for £14559. However, By 1812, the mine was returning small amounts of ore. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site) 

References:
Dewey, H. (1923) Special Reports on The Mineral Resources of Great Britain, Copper Ores of Cornwall And Devon. pp. 18-19
Dines, H.G. (1956) The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 452-457 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).
Kingsbury, A.W.G. and Hartley, J. (1956) Atacamite from Cumberland and Cornwall. Mineralogical Magazine, vol. 31, n° 235, 349-350.

 

Wheal Perran Mine: (No photos or info)

Wheal Droskyn Mine:

Wheal Droskyn Mine was an ancient and extensively worked mine. The old men’s workings can be seen in the cliffs at the western end of Perranporth beach. The adit level was at 10 fathoms and the lowest workings reached 40 fathoms below the adit. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site) 

References:

Dewey, H. (1923): Special Reports on The Mineral Resources of Great Britain, Copper Ores of Cornwall And Devon. pp. 18-19
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 452-457.
Bullen, L.J. (?): Mining in Cornwall, Vol. 5: The North Coast, pp. 105-106.

 

Ligger Bay:

Henwood (1843) noted outcrops of at least one vein, an elvan and two cross-courses in the cliffs near Perranporth, all of which were carrying crystallized quartz. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Henwood, W.J. (1843): On the Metalliferous Deposits of Cornwall and Devon. Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall 5, 1-386.

Great Wheal Leisure Mine: (No info)

North Wheal Leisure Mine: (No photos or info)

Wheal Ramouth Mine:

Mine situated in the sand dune area of Perranporth. The only record of output is black tin, reclaimed from the dumps in 1861, 1879 and between 1882 and 1902. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

The Metalliferous Mining Region of SW England, Dines, Page 448

Perran Wheal Virgin Mine, Callestock: (No photos or info)

Callestock Mine: (No photos or info)

Great South Wheal Chiverton Mine: (No photos or info)

Chiverton Valley Mine: (No photos)

Chiverton Valley Mine was a small lead and silver mine, working the southwestward extension of the Chiverton Moor main lode in 1870 and 1871, during which time it produced 85 tons of 77% lead ore and 170 oz of silver. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 502.

Chiverton Moor Mine: (orginally Great Callestock Moor Mine) (No photos)

Chiverton Moor Mine was a lead and silver mine east of Callestock, first worked in 1847 under the name of Great Callestock Moor Mine and renamed Chiverton Moor Mine when it was restarted in 1866. It was abandoned in 1873.

The workings were chiefly on an EW-trending lode, which changes strike to an almost north-easterly direction in the western part of the sett. It was opened up by three shafts, which are vertical until they pass through the lode and then inclined to follow its footwall down dip. An adit with four air shafts on its back commences near the small stream southeast of Venton Vaise farm and was driven sout-eastwards until it intersected with a minor lode, but it did not connect with any of the workings.

In 1847, Great Callestock Moor Mine produced 110 tons of 60% lead ore. Between 1866 and 1873, Chiverton Moor Mine raised another 2,130 tons of 75% lead ore and 24,000 oz of silver. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 502.

Venton Vease Mine (Ward’s Shaft): (No photos)

A single shaft, called Ward’s Shaft, which is somewhat detached from the Chiverton Moor Mine and was indicated by Spargo as a separate working. Dines lists Ward’s Shaft as belonging to Chiverton Moor Mine and makes no mention of it as having been a separate working, but he also notes, that this shaft tried two lodes which were not worked anywhere else in the sett. According to the mine plans, dated 1869 and 1873, the limited workings on Ward’s Shaft were also not connected with the other workings of Chiverton Moor Mine. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Spargo, T. (1865): The Mines of Cornwall and Devon: Statistics and Observations. Victoria Press (London), 188 pp.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 502.
 A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48SW.

West Wheal Chiverton Lead Mine: (No info)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 503-505.
Reid, C., Scrivenor, J. B., Flett, J. S., Pollard, W., & MacAlister, D. A. (1906). The geology of the country near Newquay. Printed for HM Stationery Off., by Wyman & Sons, Limited.

 

Wheal Wentworth Consols Mine: Ventongimps (No  info)

Reference:

 Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 506 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).

Ventongimps: (No photos or info)

Wheal Chiverton: (Cornubian Mine Marazanvose) (No photos or info)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 505-506 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).

Mineral Bottom Mine Marazanvose:

Mineral Bottom Mine was a small trial on a lead lode that is believed to have been the eastward extension of one of the lodes of Wentworth Consols. According to Hamilton Jenkin, the mine was worked around 1868 and was 30 fm deep. The area is now largely obscured by a dense overgrowth. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1994): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, reprint, p. l.
A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48SE.

East Wheal Chiverton Mine Marazanvose: (No photos or info)

West Cargoll Mine St Allen: (No photos)

West Cargoll Mine was a lead mine, which was active around 1863. The grid reference marks a large burrow that remains in a field NW of Zelah. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48SE.

Great Chiverton Consols: (East Wheal Elizabeth) St Allen (No info)

Wheal Frances Mine: (No photos)

Wheal Frances Mine was a mine with no records, and that has an overgrown shaft dump, located between Perranwell and Rees. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956) The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Volume 1. H.M. Stationery Office. pg. 497.

North Wheal Chiverton (Wheal Anna): (No photos or info)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956) The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Volume 1. H.M. Stationery Office. pg. 497.

Goonhavern Between Halt Road & Engelly Road (Oyster Bay site)(No photos or info)

Wheal Albert Mine: (No info)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956) The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Volume 1. H.M. Stationery Office. pg. 497.

Perran Consolidated Mines: Temple, Goonhavern (No photos or info)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956) The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Volume 1. H.M. Stationery Office. pg. 497.

New Chiverton Mine, Calley Lane, Perranwell:

New Chiverton Mine was worked between 1864 until 1878. It produced 300 tons of lead ore: 1300 ozs silver: 64 tons zinc: 15 tons pyrite & 25 tons arsenic. There were 4 shafts in the valley and the landowner is Lord Falmouth. The employees numbered 30 men. 1 woman. 4 boys. increasing to 50 employees by 1870, so not a very profitable concern.

Cap’n Grubb lived at New Chiverton farm, so next door really. The powder house was near the stream. It has been told that long ago a man from Perranwell reminisced about dismantling the boiler, it was towed away by the strength of 22 horses.

The engine house is of local stone and a tiny building nearby was a ‘dry’. The count house remains and is in good condition. A sad note, The mine carpenter, William Jewell was killed while at work there in 1878. William Tamblyn, pumpman was also killed. A reminder of what a dangerous way to try and make a living. Courtesy of Mrs Eileen Carter.

Wheal Hope: (No photos or info)

Hendra Croft: (No photos or info)

East Wheal Budnick: Hendra Croft (No photos or info)

Wheal Rose Mine: (No photos or info)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 448-449.

Wheal Budnick Mine: (No photos or info)

References:

Reid, C., Scrivenor, J.B., Flett, J.S., Pollard, W., and MacAlister, D.A. (1906): The Geology of the Country near Newquay. HMSO Publications (London), 131 pp.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 448-449.

Budnick Consols: (originally Wheal Budnick & Wheal Rose) (No photos)

Budnick Consols Mine was formed by amalgamation of two small mines, Wheal Budnick and Wheal Rose, in the area between Rose village and Reen sands. They were started in the early 19th century and initially worked for lead and silver, but later also became copper and tin producers. They were abandoned around 1870, but prospected again in 1926-27 and 1934-35.

The mines jointly worked an ENE-trending main lode (Lead Lode), roughly parallel to an elvan dyke, but interwoven with it in some places, which carried galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite near the surface, where some cassiterite was present in the wall rocks. At a depth of 44 fm, rich masses of cassiterite-bearing ores accompanied the lode on either side for several fathoms in height, length and width, and at a depth of 74 fm, cassiterite, galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite ores were mixed. The lead-zinc mineralization thus represents a later infilling of an original tin lode.

During the main period of activity in the 19th century, Lead Lode was exploited on an overall length of 1,200 yards and to a maximum depth of 78 fm. When the workings were prospected for tin in the early 20th century, attempts were made to locate the western extension of the lode, but they remained unsuccessful. In 1934-35, tin showings discovered in an old roadstone quarry in the elvan, just west of the mine workings, were exploited. An old shaft near the quarry edge was opened and irregular strings of quartz with cassiterite were found in the shallow workings. However, the values were erratic and no persistent workable ore bodies were encountered. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 448-449.

Wheal Budnick Mine: (No info)

Wheal Reen Mine: (No photo)

Wheal Reen Mine was a small copper mine, working two ENE-trending lodes in the dunes of Reen Sands that were opened up from a series of shafts along their strike. The line of shafts on the more northerly of the two lodes is still easily located in the area between Tollgate and the Perranporth Holiday Park. The workings on the southern lode, about 150 yards apart, are now largely obscured.

There is some contradiction between Dines and Hamilton Jenkin as to the location of this mine. The latter author does not mark Wheal Reen on any of his maps and attributes the workings marked by the grid reference to Wheal Creeg (see separate entry), probably based on Symons’s map of the Chiverton Mining District, dated 1869. Dines, however, points out that this conflicts with the mine plans of Perran Consols, according to which Wheal Creeg was located 400 yards farther north. From 1832 to 1836, the mine produced 100 tons of 5% copper ore. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)  

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 448.
A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.

 

Reen Sands Mine: (No photo or info)

Wheal Vlow Mine:

Wheal Vlow Mine formed the central part of the sett of Perran Consols.

The mine produced 120 tons of black tin from 1864 to 1866. The grid reference marks the approximate center point of the workings, now in the middle of a holiday park and largely built over. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 447-448.

Wheal Creeg Mine:

Wheal Creeg Mine was located just south of Wheal Vlow. It worked two ENE-trending lodes, Wheal Creeg North and South Lodes, about 65 fm apart and trending parallel to the Wheal Vlow Lode. The mine plans show that the northern lode was opened up by crosscuts about 80 fm south from the Wheal Vlow workings. Whether the southern lode was developed or not is not known.

There is some contradiction between Dines and Hamilton Jenkin as to the location of this mine. The latter author places Wheal Creeg about 400 yards farther south, in agreement with Symons’s map of the Chiverton Mining District, dated 1869. These workings however, attributed by Dines to Wheal Reen (see separate entry), show shafts on two lodes that are more than 150 yards apart, which obviously conflicts with the mine plans cited above. It is also unlikely that crosscuts would have been driven from the Wheal Vlow workings for such a distance when there had been shafts on the Wheal Creeg lodes.

Because the extent of workings in the Wheal Creeg section is not known and the area is now largely built over by a holiday park, the mine cannot be precisely located. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 447-448.
A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.

Perran Consols: (No photos)

Perran Consols was a tin mine in the dunes of Gear Sands, formed around 1870 by amalgamation of several small workings. The main lode was Wheal Vlow Lode, which trends ENE and crops out beneath the dunes. It was worked by Wheal Widden in the west and Wheal Vlow in the central part of the sett. Although the area is now largely built over by a holiday park, some traces of the old mine workings are still visible.

From 1869 to 1874, Perran Consols produced 220 tons of black tin. Another 3 tons were raised in 1894 and 1895. In 1927, the mine was reopened, but this did not result in any further production. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 447-448.
 A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.
 

Wheal Widden Mine: (No photos)

Wheal Widden Mine was a small mine in the western part of the sett. It worked the Wheal Vlow Lode from three shafts at a distance of about 300 yards from the coast. The extent of the workings is not known. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 447-448.
 
 

Wheal Mary: 

Wheal Mary was a small mine in the dunes of Penhale Sands, about half a mile south of the Gravel Hill Mine. The portal of the adit is located at the foot of the cliffs immediately west of the workings. According to Dines, it worked an ENE-trending lode for tin and copper. Hamilton Jenkin, however, states that it worked a NS-trending lode for copper and lead. There are no records of output. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 447.

Halwyn Pit: (Halwyn Mine) (No photos) 

Halwyn Pit was a  small opencast working on the Perran Iron Lode. Two open shafts WNW of the pit (SW772567) also belong to the sett. There are no mine plans, nor records of output. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 442.

Mount Mine:

Mount Mine was an iron mine on the Perran Iron Lode, originally worked opencast from two pits, a small western one and a large eastern one, about 70 yards apart. The eastern pit was 200 ft long, up to 80 ft wide and 100 ft deep. The oxidation of the siderite stopped at about 50 ft below surface and the workings at the bottom of the pit, which were in two large chambers, exposed massive grey siderite ore with scattered specks of sulphides.

An adit, wide enough to take normal-gauge railway wagons, was driven from 300 yards NNE of the eastern pit to open up the lode at greater depth. It passed 40 ft below the pit, to which it was connected by an ore-pass winze. A mine plan shows that drives were carried out from the tunnel below the pit 100 ft east and 150 ft west at two levels. Several crosscuts from each of the drives cross the position of the lode, but there is no stoping shown, indicating, that the rich orebodies which were certainly expected were not found.

There also are two old shafts NE and NNE of the pit, which are believed to be on the southern extension of Trebisken Lode. According to the plans, the shafts were connected to the adit, but it is not known whether the lode was exploited here. However, some lead and silver ores were sold when the mine was operated as Mount and Trebisken Mine.

Mount Mine was reopened in 1916 without success and during the Second World war (1939-1945), was investigated as a source of iron ore. An inclined shaft was sunk just east of the eastern pit and followed the footwall of the lode. Drives were carried out on both sides to prove the lode, but the values were rather patchy and wartime production remained small. The grid reference marks the site of Engine Shaft. The chimney of the engine house still stands in the field south of the eastern pit, which is now backfilled and overgrown.

From 1858 to 1877, the mine produced 45,826 tons of brown iron ore, 5.5 tons of lead ore, 10 tons of silver ore and some native silver under the name Trebisken and Mount. As Mount Mine, it produced 4,262 tons of iron ore in 1871, 1873, 1880, 1905 and 1907, and 11 tons of lead ore in 1854. As Perran Iron Mine, it returned 164 tons of brown iron ore in 1866 and, for the New Perran Iron Company, another 2,728 tons of iron ore and 49 tons of manganese ore were recorded in 1878. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 442-443 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).
 

At this mine two or three openings have been made, from which many thousands of tons of iron ore have been raised, nearly the whole of which has been brown hematite, as the workings have not been deep enough yet to reach the white spathose. “see Longitudinal Section of some Workings on The Perran Iron Lode – 1877 below”

There is nothing to notice here except that the openings have proved the continuation of the deposit or lode. Analyses of ore from this mine, by Dr. Percy, give the following results:- Metallic iron- 52.91 % & Metallic manganese- 2.36 %

(Courtesy of “On the Perran Iron Lode in Cornwall & The Mines in the District by Charles Parkin) 

South Mount Mine: (Crows-an-Carne Mine) (No photos)

South Mount Mine was a small open cut in a pipe-like body of iron-bearing carbonates (“spathic ore”). Analysis of a sample collected in 1941 shows a rather low iron content, but much calcium and magnesium; the material thus has to be considered as an iron-bearing dolomite. The pit was located just east of the road leading to Perranporth, but is now completely backfilled. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 443.

Treamble Works & Mine:

Treamble Mine was an iron mine on the Perran Iron Lode, started in the middle of the 19th century and worked intermittently until the second world war. The lode, which passed about 30 yards south of Treamble farm, was originally worked from two open cuts, located SW and SE of the farm, respectively. When the western pit was excavated, a NS-trending lead lode was exposed which is believed to represent the southern extension of Trebellan lode that also was worked a little further north by North Retallack Mine. The lode is said to have intersected with the Perran Iron Lode, close to which it carried native silver and silver ores.

The pits opened up the lode on an overall length of 235 yards. The extent of workings in the western pit is not exactly known, because it was backfilled early. The eastern pit, also known as Garden quarry, was 60 ft deep and up to 120 ft wide. Later on, shallow shafts were sunk along the strike of the lode, but not much further underground development was carried out. Dines notes that the very limited amount of stoping shown on the mine plans, and the exposures in the eastern pit do not justify the reports by contemporary authors about the amount and quality of the ores raised.

The early period of activity ended around 1892 and the mine lay idle until 1937, when it was taken over by Lloyd’s Perran Iron Company. A new pit, 250 yards long and 150 yards wide, was excavated to a depth of about 20 ft in the eastern part of the sett. However, no continuous ore bodies were encountered and the lode, which was expected to be about 40 ft wide, was not thicker than 14 ft. In 1940, after about 4,000 tons of ore had been raised, the workings were abandoned and the mine was taken over by the Home Ores Department, who did some further development and continued working it until 1943.

The area has now been converted into a caravan park. The pits are backfilled and there are no traces of the mine workings left. The grid reference marks the site where the eastern pit was located.

From 1859 to 1892, the mine produced 15,300 tons of brown iron ore, 958 tons of mixed brown iron and spathic ore, 32 tons of 75% lead ore, 7 tons of 40% zinc ore and 130 oz of silver. From 1937 to 1940, 4,000 tons of iron ore were raised, and another 15,000 tons of ore are recorded for the last period of activity between 1940 and 1943. In addition, up to 500 tons per year of fullers earth were produced from decomposed killas. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 439, 443-444.
A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.
 

The lode has been worked away to a considerable extent here by means of an open quarry (H), Plate No. XVI. “see Longitudinal Section of some Workings on The Perran Iron Lode – 1877 below” , or cutting about ten fathoms deep. The brown hematite cropping out to the surface, and the white spathose plainly visible in the bottom.

“I” is a shaft worked by a water-wheel in the valley below at the bottom of which a lead lode was cut, from which a quantity of lead ore, highly productive in silver, was raised.

“J” is “Parkin’s” shaft, at which a sixty-inch pumping engine is erected. The shaft is 20 fathoms deep.

“K” is “Berriman’s” shaft and workings, where most of the ore sold from this mine was raised, and where the lode is larger than at any other point which has been opened tip. A kiln has been erected here for roasting the ore, but it is constructed in such a manner that it is very doubtful of its being equal to the work for which it is intended. (Courtesy of “On the Perran Iron Lode in Cornwall & The Mines in the District by Charles Parkin) 

 

Treamble Mine, 1920s. Two miles NE of Perranporth. Although situated in an area where principally mined iron ore, a further product at Treamble was the soft talcky substance calk Fullers Earth. Some 500 tons a year was sold for such diverse uses as refining of vegetable for a filler for paint, rubber and bituminous products. 

North Retallack Mine: (No photos)

North Retallack Mine worked several NS-trending lodes in the area immediately north of the Treamble mine. One of the lodes was the southern extension of Trebellan lode, and it is also believed, that it was this lode that was exposed in the western pit of the Treamble Mine.

The mine formed part of the Great Retallack sett. It produced 5 tons of lead ore in 1869. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 444-445.

Great Retallack Mine: (No photos)

Great Retallack Mine worked the Perran Iron Lode for about 300 yards east of the Treamble Mine. The grid reference marks the site of Engine Shaft. Hamilton Jenkin notes that the engine house still standing there in 1953 was wantonly destroyed in 1956. Today, no trace of the workings is left.

Between 1858 and 1880, the mine produced 10,826 tons of iron ore, 11,639 tons of zinc ore, 198 tons of 75% lead ore and 600 oz of silver. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 48NW.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 444-445 (see also the corrigenda in the 1994 reprint)
 

The winter has not had the opportunity of personally inspecting this mine, but the owner of the royalty, Francis Retallack, Esq., has been kind enough to supply the following information, which goes to show that it is a very valuable mine. It has been worked for many years for iron, silver lead, and blende, more especially for the latter mineral. Upwards of £2,000 has been paid in royalty dues, which for so small a plot of ground is a considerable sum. The quantity of lead ore sold was very small, but it contained so much silver that it made a very high price, one parcel, it is understood, bringing the unusually high figure of nearly £300 per ton. The pumping engine at the adjoining mine (Duchy Peru) drains the whole of this sett, which at present is being worked for blende only. (Courtesy of “On the Perran Iron Lode in Cornwall & The Mines in the District by Charles Parkin) 

 

Duchy Peru Mine: (No photos)

Duchy Peru Mine was the largest and deepest mine on the whole Perran Iron Lode. It lies about 400 yards southwest of Rejerrah, at grid reference SW796556. Like many other mines on the lode it was formerly worked as an open work. It worked the lode from a number of shafts: Roebuck’s, Vallance’s, Carter’s New, Carter’s Old, Tennant’s and Old Engine (Old Sump) Shaft.

Between 1858 and 1860, Duchy Peru produced: 21,400 tons of Haematite, 11,000 tons of mixed haematite/spathic ore, 760 tons of pyrite, 180 tons of ochre and umber, 20,000 tons of zinc ore (ranging from 20% to 47% metal, and 3 tons of 34% lead ore. In 1860 it raised 185 tons of 3.5% copper ore and 185 tons of silver-copper. Courtesy of Mr Kenneth Rainbow.

The most extensive mine developed on the Perran Iron Lode. The lode was first worked by open casts; then by shafts sunk to a depth of 145 mts at Roebucks shaft. In would appear from Dines (1956) that the ore shoots were confined between NNW transverse planes (?faults). The iron lode is intersected by a N-S lead lode, which has some development on it. The mine is known to have been active at times between 1828-86. The decomposition of pyrite in the mine is said to have been a problem. Due to the high temperatures and bad air it created. Recorded output: 34000 tons of iron ore; 760 tons of pyrite; 180 tons of ochre; 20000 tons of zinc ore; 185 tons of copper ore & 3 tons of lead ore. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Smyth, W. (1882): The Duchy Peru Lode, Perranzabuloe. Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall 10, 120-130.
Reid, C., Scrivenor, J.B., Flett, J.S., Pollard, W., and MacAlister, D.A. (1906): The Geology of the Country near Newquay. HMSO Publications (London), 131 pp.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 445-446.

Not only have many thousands of tons of iron ore been raised from this mine, but also quantities of copper, sulphur, mundi, and blende.

“L” is “Carter’s” shaft (Plate No. XVI.) “see Longitudinal Section of some Workings on The Perran Iron Lode – 1877 below” sunk down to the forty-fathom level, the brown hematite (of “cellular” character) from this point was unexceptionally good and free from all impurities; stones of white spathose were frequently met with towards the bottom of this shaft, enveloped in a shell of cellular brown ore of about an inch in thickness.

“M” is “Roebuck’s” shaft, which is the most important one of all which have been sunk on the lode, proving, as it does, the existence of while spathose ore to a depth of nearly seventy fathoms, and thirty fathoms at least below the datum line of high-water mark. A sixty-inch cylinder pumping engine is erected here, which draws about 500 gallons of water per minute. This engine is draining the water from the next mine (Deer Park), a distance of about one and a half miles.

“N” is “Vallance’s shaft sunk for winding purposes, and is fifty fathoms deep. An inclined tramway connects this mine with the Treatable Mines and the Cornwall Minerals Railway. (Courtesy of “On the Perran Iron Lode in Cornwall & The Mines in the District by Charles Parkin) 

Deer Park Mine: (No photo)

Deer Park Mine was an unsuccessful venture, working the furthest eastern extensions of the Great Perran Iron Lode for iron from 1875 to 1879, but is known to have been at work long before this date. In about 1814 whiel an adit level being driven towards the iron lode it intersected a lead lode (Dines says there were 3 or 4 north-south lead lodes). A few dumps and pits are left in the fields near the abandoned Shepherds branch railway line. The iron lode has been traced for a further 1.5 kms east, but there are no recorded workings.

Recorded output: 267 tons of iron ore; 3 tons of lead ore & 10 tons of zinc ore.  (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 446-447.
Atkinson, B. (1994): Mining Sites in Cornwall, Vol. 2, Dyllansow Truran (Truro), 51 pp.

This is the most easterly point at which the Perran iron lode has been opened, and is in close proximity to the celebrated East Wheal Rose and Shepherd’s Lead Mines, the former having divided about £287,000 in twelve years, and the latter about £80,000 in sixteen years. See Plates XVI. and XVII. “see Longitudinal Section of some Workings on The Perran Iron Lode – 1877 below”

In the Deer Park sett there are three lead lodes, and the iron lode dis­covered, and the writer will now give detailed particulars of the workings, which he thinks go to confirm the theory that this large deposit of iron, is merely the “back,” or gossan, of lead and copper lodes respectively.

No.1 lead lode (Plate No. XVII.) “see Longitudinal Section of some Workings on The Perran Iron Lode – 1877 below” is an east and west one, which was discovered by means of an adit taken up from the “Whipsey” Pit, about fifty fathoms west of the  “Old Engine” shaft, and worked upon about fifty years ago. This adit was driven on the course of the lode, pro­ducing iron pyrites and lead ore. The result induced the company to put up steam power at the “Old Engine” shaft, which was sunk twenty- five fathoms below the adit, and levels were driven east and west on the lode eleven fathoms below it, which yielded about one ton of lead ore per fathom. From the bottom of the “Old Engine” shaft a quantity of white spathose iron was raised, but at this time, in the year 1882, there being no demand for Cornish iron ore, and the price for lead being only about £8 per ton, the mine was stopped. The iron ore has, however, been picked out of the burrows lately and sold. This lode (lead) is about 2 feet 6 inches wide, mid is composed of floogen, decomposed elvan, spar, and small lead ore; it has been also cut about 100 fathoms east of the u Old Engine” shaft, and galena taken from it at this point, within ten fathoms from the surface, yielded about 70 per cent, of lead and upwards of 15 ounces of silver per ton.

At the “Whipsey” pit the lead lode comes in contact with the iron lode, and the latter is so impregnated with lead ore that it is found profitable to stamp it by hard labour for the lead alone. If it were probable that this lead-bearing iron ore was to be found in any bulk in depth, proper stamps would he erected to crush it; but the writer is of opinion that the iron lode will die out in depth, and give place to the lead ore.

No.2 lead lode, also an east and west one, was cut near “Barton’s shaft in the year 1875, and since that time several parcels of lead ore has been raised, yielding about 22 ounces of silver per ton, and it sold for about  £18 per ton. These parcels were got within four fathoms of the surface.

“Barton’s” shaft has now been sunk down to the eleven-fathom level “old  workings” where the operations go to show that although large quantities of lead ore have been stored away, yet nothing has been done on the iron lode which is impregnated with lead here again. By sinking this shaft ten fathoms deeper the lead lode will be intersected in the shaft.

No.3 lode is about 18 inches wide, producing stones of lead ore, which were analysed by Captain Champion, and found to contain 30 ounces of silver per ton and 80 per cent, of lead.

From the iron lode about 10,000 tons of iron ore have been raised by the late company who worked the mine, all of which has been quarried from openings of about three to four fathoms deep, but hundreds of tons have been of this quantity have been full of lead ore; in some cases stones of iron ore have contained so much as 40 per cent, of lead, and the percentage of lead in one cargo of iron sent away was 20 per cent. But taking the iron lode at the depths to which it has been proved to be productive at the various mines, it must yield a very large quantity of ore; and if in depth it should give place to either lead or copper, the latter deposits will no doubt be unusually rich ones from the fact of having such a rich “gossan” overlying them.  (Courtesy of “On the Perran Iron Lode in Cornwall & The Mines in the District by Charles Parkin) 

Peru Mine: (No photos)

Peru Mine a small lead mine, located on the south side of the valley SE of Trelaske farm. It worked a NS-trending lode and two EW-trending lodes, about 100 yards apart, that cross the former. Several shafts and some overgrown dumps are remaining in the woodland near the river. Not to be confused with the Duchy Peru Mine. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956) The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 440.

Wheal Mexico Mine:

Wheal Mexico Mine a small lead mine, working a NS-trending lode (Trebellan lode) in the valley south of Trebellan farm. It was already worked before 1584, presumably for silver. Around 1785, rich silver ores were discovered and the mine was restarted under the name Wheal Mexico. Although the deposit was not extensive, it yielded £2,000 pounds worth of ore (Carne, 1818). The later workings were on both sides of the river, straddling the border between the parishes of Cubert and Perranzabuloe.

According to Hamilton Jenkin, the Tithe map of Perranzabuloe, dated 1843, shows Wheal Mexico immediately north of Treworthen farm, on the south side of the river (in Perranzabuloe parish). These workings are probably identical with the Treworthy Mine described by the German Ulrich Frosse in 1584. An earlier working by the German Burkhard Kranich is recorded at the time of Queen Mary, between 1553 and 1558. Philip Rashleigh visited the mine and obtained a specimen of native silver.

The southern extension of the lode runs through the sett of North Retallack Mine and enters that of Treamble Mine (see separate entry), where it is said to intersect with the Perran Iron lode. About 20 fm north of the presumed intersection, it carried silver ores and native silver in addition to argentiferous galena. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Carne, J. (1818) On the discovery of silver in the mines of Cornwall. Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall, Vol. 1, pp. 118-126.
Dines, H.G. (1956) The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 439, 507 (also see addenda in the 1994 reprint).
Hamilton Jenkin, A.K. (xxxx) Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.
 

Gravel Hill Mine & Quarry – The Big Iron Pit:

Gravel Hill Mine (earlier known as Penhale Iron Mine and Cliff Iron Mine) worked the western end of the Perran Iron Lode. Where the lode crops out in the cliff, it consists of two branches that are separated by a course of killas. Both branches were worked from the cliff face, and the stopes still stand as large caverns. About 170 yards SE of the cliff workings is a small but deep opencast called the Big Iron Pit. Another excavation just north of the caverns is from an old quarry in an elvan dyke and not related to the mine workings.

Underground development was carried out from an adit at beach level, which follows the north branch of the lode, and from shafts near the cliff edge. The base of the oxidized zone is about at adit level. Below this, the lode is reported to narrow and to consist mainly of blue fluccan (clay) with fragments of sulphides. About midway between the cliff and the Big Iron Pit, the lode is crossed by a NS-trending lode, which is believed to represent the southern extension of the lode worked at the Phoenix Mine.

The mine is known to have been active before 1728, but output figures are only available for the later workings. Between 1874 and 1882, it produced 7,400 tons of brown iron ore grading at 47% Fe, 10,379 tons of mixed limonite and spathic ores, and 30 tons of 40% zinc ore. Another 165 tons of brown iron ore recorded in 1866 under the name Perran Bay may refer to the cliff workings. When the mine was reopened around 1916 (Cantrill et al., 1919), it apparently did not produce any ores. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

Cantrill, T.C., Sherlock, R.L., Dewey, H. (1919) Special Reports on the Mineral Resources of Great Britain, Volume 9 – Iron Ores. HMSO Publications (London), pages 61-67.
Dines, H.G. (1956) The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Volume 1, pages 441-442 (see also corrigenda in the 1994 reprint).
Hamilton Jenkin, A.K. (xxxx) Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.
 

Nearly the whole of the surface of this sett or royalty is covered with sandhills. A reference to the geological map of the district will show it marked “blown sands,” which consist of the detritus of sea shells. Analysis shows them to contain from 80 to 85 per cent, of carbonate of lime and some phosphates. These sands are so light that they are blown for miles inland, and a Church, “St. Piran’s,” which was built in this district, was enveloped in sand to such an extent that about the year 1800 it was found necessary to pull it down and build it further inland.

The workings consist of an adit “C” on Plate No. XVI., see Longitudinal Section of some Workings on The Perran Iron Lode – 1877 below”, which has been driven in from the base of the cliff (a few feet above high-water mark) by the side of the lode which intersects at about 60 fathoms in from the cliff. The bearings differ at this point from the general bearings of the lode, which has, together with other indications, led many to believe that this is either a distinct lode, or a branch from the main one. “D” is a shaft sunk down to this level, going through the brown hematite overlie, into a mixture of that ore and white spathose. “E” is “ Borlase’s” shaft;. In the 13 fathom levels here is found the brown cellular ore, nine fathoms wide, and the analyses given are from ore taken from this level. Dynamite has been found far better than powder for blasting this “cellular” ore. “F” and “G” are also shafts sunk to prove the continuation of the lode.

The engine which is erected near “ Borlase’s”  shaft is adapted both for pumping and winding. It draws the ore up a steep incline from the workings at the foot of the cliff to the summit, where a self-acting drum lowers the ore down the opposite side of the hill into railway waggons. (Courtesy of “On the Perran Iron Lode in Cornwall & The Mines in the District by Charles Parkin) 

 

Penhale Mine:

Penhale Mine is known to have been at work in 1777 when it produced 41 tons of lead ore, but in common with other mines in this area it is probably much older. From this date Penhale appears to have been at work untill about 1826.
It was reopened in 1830, but only lasted a year due to the low price of lead. In 1848 the mine was amalgamated with Wheal Golden to the north, and East Wheal Golden. There was a further reworking from 1867 to about 1870. Dines records that iron ore was also worked possibly from the Perran Iron Lode. Which the Wheal Golden-Penhale lead lode must intersect with.

Recorded output:  100 tons of copper ore; 1475 tons of lead ore; 7150 oz of silver (from lead ore) & 7100 tons of iron ore. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Wheal Phoenix Mine: Penhale Sands (No info)

Reference:

Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 439.

Wheal Golden Mine – Penhale Point:

Wheal Golden Mine worked a nearly north-south striking lead lode extending from the tip of Penhale Point for around 500 metres southwards where the lode passes into the sett of Penhale Mine.

The course of this lode can be clearly seen in the cliffs, marked by the major gangue mineral of a comby structured quartz.

Extensive shallow workings are present on the lode and can be clearly seen in the cliffs as well.

The pumping engine house that formerly stood on Engine Shaft had a fine castellated chimney stack of the same style as that which still survives at Wheal Ellen, Porthtowan.

Unfortunately this engine house and those of the neighbouring Penhale Mine and Phoenix Mine were all demolished following a daylight air raid on the adjacent Penhale army training camp in World War Two.

Wheal Golden’s ore was noted as being quite argentiferous with considerable silver being produced along with lead. It is noted that during its working Wheal Golden was equipped with its own smelting house.

The site of Engine Shaft of Wheal Golden lies under the car park of the secure compound that lies on Penhale Point and has been plugged securely following a recent collapse. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, pp. 438-439.

 

Pidgeon Green Mine (Wheal Phoenix): (No photos)

Pidgeon Green Mine was a small lead mine on parallel lode to Wheal Golden. Shaft dump and adit in roof of sea cave. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Mellingey Mine: (No photos)

Mellingey Mine was a small silver and lead mine, active in the early 20th century. Hamilton Jenkin indicates a shaft and an adit just NW of Mellingey farm. This area forms now part of the Holywell Holiday Park, and all traces of the mine workings have disappeared. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.

Ellenglaze Mine: (No photos)

Ellenglaze Mine was a small lead mine, abandoned in 1839. Hamilton Jenkin indicates the portal of an adit just south of Ellenglaze hamlet, and several shafts north and NW of it. The grid reference marks a small overgrown burrow in the corner of a field, where one of the shafts was located. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

Reference:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.

Trebisken Mine (Trebisken Green Mine) (No photos) 

Trebisken Mine was a  small lead mine SE of Trebisken farm, working a NS-trending lode crossed by an EW-trending lode from a single shaft sunk on the intersection.

Trebisken Mine produced 861 tons of 65% lead ore and 9,190 oz of silver. Under the name Trebisken Green Mine, 7.5 tons of lead ore and 4 tons of black tin were raised in 1861. (Courtesy of mindat.org web site)

References:

A.K. Hamilton Jenkin: Annotations to Ordnance Survey map, scale 1:10,000, sheet 39SW.
Dines, H.G. (1956): The metalliferous mining region of south-west England. HMSO Publications (London), Vol. 1, p. 439 (see also addenda in the 1994 reprint).

 

 

Shepherds Station – Treamble Mineral Line – Gravel Hill Tramway

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of the Shepherds Station to the Treamble Mineral Line to the Gravel Hill Tramway over the years.

Excerpts courtesy of The Cornwall Railway Society website – http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/

Shepherds Station.

Also well known and well documented was the removal of the rails from Shepherds Halt to Treamble, allegedly to help with the overseas rail lines during the First World War. The track bed was still used by the War Office as an alternative route to the Camp and a massively over engineered bridge was built over the track just to the east of the Halt.

As clouds darkened over Europe again in the 1920s, a decision was made to re-instate the Treamble branch, with a cover story that the mines in the area had re-opened. In reality, the War Office and the American War Department wanted somewhere in Cornwall to store munitions and other non-perishable supplies in preparation for an assault on the European mainland, should the ‘Peace in Our Time’ intuitive fail. Deerpark Mine, just to the south west of Rejerrah was chosen as the adits were still sound and relatively water free.

It was at this time the track plan at Shepherds Halt was altered to that seen in the popular railway publication and press. This re-connection of a direct link to Penhale Camp made it much easier to move troops and supplies, as trains could now run from London straight to the camp itself.

The fact that Shepherds was never an efficient or important station, as far as the GWR were concerned, can be seen by their reluctance to develop the site to their normal standard. There was no goods shed, the ‘cattle dock’ was built using old track rails rather than the usual fence post & rails, the platform itself was only wood, unlike the solid brick and stone constructions elsewhere on the line. The signal box was a short affair, placed on the platform rather than a separate building.

The War Office & The Camping Coach

With no road access to Deerpark Mine, goods to be moved out of the stores were re-loaded onto wagons and brought the few hundred yards back to Shepherds Station. The wagons were unloaded onto lorries out of sight of the station, the lorries then used the over bridge to join the main road network at Fiddlers Green.

The bridge also stretched across the wide yard to the south of the lines – this area was used for marshalling the lorries.

As the cattle dock was not really intended to be functional, much to the War Office’s dismay the GWR installed a camping coach in the siding. However, this proved to be of benefit as it was commandeered and used by the British and American military top brass to discuss the D-Day preparations.

Closures

Following the end of the war, the Treamble branch saw less and less military traffic and was closed in 1952. In 1963, the complete line from Chacewater to Tolcarne Junction was closed. In order to maintain the secrecy of the smaller Penhale Camp and the role it played, it was decided to remove all traces of Shepherds Station. This exercise was not completely successful, for the sharp eyed there are still some remnants to be found.

Courtesy of stubby47 on RMWeb. 

Treamble Branch – 3 miles 20 chains long
The line was an extension of the Treffry Tramway route from Tolcarne to East Wheal Rose the extension having been carried out by the Cornwall Minerals Railway in 1874. The branch was further extended to by a mile to Gravel Hill however this section closed in 1888.

The Minerals Branch line from Shepherds to Treamble had a chequered history. The mine closed in 1892 but the track was left in place.

In 1905 part of the route between a new Junction at Shepherds to Tolcarne was upgraded to form the Perranporth to Newquay section of the Chacewater to Perranporth branch which had opened in 1903.

In January 1917 it was taken up and shipped to France as part of the war effort. However, after the War there was an upturn in the minerals market and the rails were re-instated, the line being in use again by 1926.

Further prospecting took place at Treamble in the 1930’s & 1940’s but the revival of mining was short-lived. The branch was used by troop trains for Penhale Camp during World War 2 The line from Treamble to Shepherds closed 1st January 1952 and the track taken up in 1956.

The Treamble Mineral Line is always quoted as closing in 1956 ‘last revenue-earning traffic 1949’. The reason for this unusual terminology is that the line was used for the storage of wagons after 1949. Some are visible on one of the web site pictures.

N.B. It is understood that during WW2 a passenger train travelled the branch – this was a troop train. Also a witness remembers seeing a steam hauled demolition train on the branch during 1956.

Rejerrah Bridge  
The Treamble Mineral Line which ran from Shepherds to Treamble Mine had a chequered history – it was opened in 1873.  Closed and lifted w.e.f. 1st January 1917.  Relaid December 1925, reopened 16th Feb 1926.  The last revenue earning traffic was carried 8th August 1949. It was finally closed w.e.f.1st Jan 1952 The track was removed on 31st March 1956. (Rlys of Cornwall C.R. Clinker)

As a schoolboy my only sporting achievement was to run for my school at Cross Country. In those days a special bus laid on for school sports was a rare occurrence. I have clear memory of seeing a train on the Treamble Mineral Line from a Bridge on the original A375 at Rejerrah.

Until today I thought that this bridge must have disappeared under a road improvement scheme. However, looking along the old road using Google Street View I found that the old bridge is still there, somewhat chocked with rubbish.  Today 17th May 2014 the spot was revisited – the pictures are below. It is understood that the branch did see one passenger train – a troop train during WW2. Courtesy of Mr Keith Jenkin.

Gravel Hill Tramway

Mr Colin Burges provided much of the information and all of the photographs, it was only by his exploration in recent years we have gained more knowledge of this very short lived line.

​”Possibly the least photographed and documented railway outpost in Cornwall lies at the end of the former extension from Treamble serving the iron mines on Penhale Sands, abandoned in the late 19th century.

Much of the area was M.O.D. property attached to Penhale Camp. It is still private and the only permitted way to reach the terminus is by means of the coast path.

On a miserable day last summer (2016)  I ventured out from Holywell, walking twice the distance I would have done had I entered the camp. Last month (August 2017)  I left my bike in the car park on the far side of the holiday camp and went down to the wonderful expanse of Perran Sands”.

The Tramway extended from Gravel Hill Quarry out on the coast to the left to run up to the Treamble Terminus bottom right hand side of this map.

The Gravel Hill Mine end of the line. It split into two with one siding continuing on to the Mine engine house. The other line descended towards the mouth of the Mine by means of a rope worked incline. The incline was powered by a 11.5″ steam engine.           From Old Maps – OS 1880’s.

At Gravel Hill the lode was developed from a beach level adit (tunnel)  and also from shafts on the cliff top. The lode was also worked about 170 yards inland in an opencast pit called the ‘Big Iron Pit’. The Iron lode is crossed by a N-S lead lode worked a short distance to the north in Wheal Phoenix, and East Wheal Golden.
You can see ‘The Big Iron Pit, an evil looking working by clicking below –  ​https://www.aditnow.co.uk/Mines/Gravel-Hill-Mixed-Mine_5842/
Production
​Originally the mine was known as Penhale Iron Mine, Gravel Hill is known to have been at work before 1728, also in the 1840’s; and from 1874-82. Output figures are only available for the last working. When it produced about 8000 tons of iron ore, and 30 tons of zinc ore. In excess of 35,000 tons of ‘Spathose’ ore was extracted during the life of the mine.

My understanding is that the Gravel Hill extension was laid in 1888, but without parliamentary sanction (new railways required an act of parliament). Perhaps the Cornwall Mineral Railway was just chancing it. Records seem to agree that Gravel Hill Mine was abandoned in 1882, so was the railway a wild-west style attempt to revive the mine?

The OS 25 inch map for 1906 shows not the slightest trace of any railway to Gravel Hill. My guess is that the tracks lasted for no more than a year or two. It needs to be borne in mind that OS maps were not revised systematically – hence something which caught the surveyor’s eye in one year, may be gone in the next. Article courtesy of Mr Roy Hart.

The Treamble Mineral Line terminus – the branch from Shepherds comes in from the right. The Gravel Hill Tramway rose up alongside to make a trailing connection with the main branch. Colin Burges kindly advises us that –

“I hadn’t noticed before that the Treamble line’s mileage was originally measured from Fowey, the furthest reach of the C.M.R. Look for M.P. 32 on the first map. In later years, possibly after the line was re-laid, the mileage was measured from Shepherds”.

Notes re Colin’s photographs :- Photos of the Bridges – Railway and Stream – were taken where it says “Ford” on the map. The old M.o.D. gate is where you see “Spring” and “Weighing Machine” at the bend in the road. The road beyond the gate is not the Tramway but he is sure it joins the formation a little way along.

Creation of the Halt

In 1903 the GWR opened the line from Chacewater to Perranporth. The War Office pressed for the line to be extended to join with the Treamble branch, and Shepherds farm was chosen as the most inconspicuous spot. In order to help with the subterfuge, the original direct link to Treamble (& Penhale Camp) was re-aligned, and a simple halt with a kickback siding installed.

This simple arrangement allowed freight trains arriving from Truro to leave a wagon or two in the siding, from where they would be collected later by the small loco running the Treamble branch. Similarly, wagons could be left in the siding and collected by any passing Newquay/Par bound freight. These collections were usually timed to be between any scheduled passenger trains.

Shepherds Halt

Penhale Camp

In the late 1800s, the War Office saw the potential of establishing a large training camp on the dunes above Perranporth. The camp was split into two for operational and security reasons. The main part of the camp was positioned on the headland between Ligger Point and Penhale Point, the other smaller part of the camp was hidden in the valley to the southwest of Cubert.

Here, well away from prying eyes, troops were trained in all sorts of offensive combat, including demolition and sabotage. Whereas the Cornish population were usually keen to avoid any entanglement with government officials, especially the Excise Men, this ‘not seen anything’ attitude was encouraged by the War Office in order to keep the camp and its activities as quiet as possible. In exchange, the Government itself discouraged too much involvement of its officers with the locals’ nocturnal dealings. Even today, only the main part of the camp on the headland is marked on OS Maps of the area.

With the arrival of the railway first to St Newlyn East, and then later to Treamble, the War Office were able to move troops and supplies to and from Penhale Camp far easier and with even less fuss.

Bolingey Viaduct – Goonhavern Halt – Shepherds Station

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of Bolingey Viaduct to Goonhavern Halt to  Shepherds Station over the years.

Excerpts courtesy of The Cornwall Railway Society website – http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/

Truro – Newquay Branch line

So ended the last run over the line originally constructed in two sections. The first section of about eight miles to Perranporth, was opened on July 6, 1903. The contractor was Arthur Carkeek, who was knighted in 1916. Hundreds of men, without mechanical aids, cut their way through high mounds of stone and rubble, shovelled thousands of tons of rocks into gullies to make embankments, built some thirty bridges and the fine five arch viaduct near Goonbell.

The 10-mile second section from Perranporth to Newquay was completed on January 2, 1905, well behind schedule, as it had been hoped the line would be in use for holidaymakers in the summer of 1904, but the engineers had met considerable difficulty. It was opened on 14th August 1905. At Goonhavern, sand instead of stone was found, and there were many falls.

Ripping up of Newquay line

The final blow came when on 2nd January 1964 when there was a short item in the ‘West Briton’. The final episode in the 60 year history of the Chacewater – Newquay line was begun yesterday, when a start was made on the removal of the rails. A train drawing five trucks went from Chacewater to Shepherds, and this will continue once a week until the rails are removed back to Chacewater.

Shepherds Halt – the true story of Shepherds Station

Recent research into the history of Shepherds Station has unearthed a hitherto unknown and quite interesting story. What most books would lead you to believe is mostly true, but there are sinister undertones involving the War Office, and the British and American Militaries.

 Shepherds Station

Shepherds was a sizeable station, one of only three on the branch (Chacewater – Newquay line), built on traditional lines with a weighbridge, passing loop, separate “up” and “down” platforms and a stationmaster.

The Passenger Service

In the early days of the branch line, passengers were conveyed between Newquay and Chacewater by Steam Railcars but these were not popular and were soon replaced by steam locomotives hauling conventional carriages. To start with, the service was planned to meet the anticipated travelling requirements of potential passengers and in 1905 six trains operated each way between Chacewater and Newquay with one extra train on Saturdays only and no trains on Sundays. lt appears that the running of trains on a Sunday was never contemplated, probably because of the strong Methodist following in the area.

Travel to Truro by train was now cheaper than going via Par and quicker,  all be it still by a roundabout route. For example, the ordinary return fare from Newquay to Truro was 2s 6d as opposed to 6s 8d via Par. As traffic increased so the service became more frequent and was eight trains in each direction in 1927 and twelve in 1938 but dropped back to eleven in 1958. From 1962, diesels took over all services. Passenger traffic was light but constant during the winter months and usually heavy during the summer. Beach Halt at Perranporth, opened in July 1931, was the last halt to be built on the line and was popular with those wanting a day out on Perranporth Beach.  For those wanting a Railside holiday, there was a camping coach in a siding at Shepherds which was generally well booked.

By the 1960s growth in the ownership and use of cars had significantly reduced the number of passengers travelling by public transport. The Government was looking to reduce subsidies and set in motion a review of railway operations. The so-called “Beeching Plan” was the outcome and proposed the closure of many branch lines where annual expenditure exceeded income. The Chacewater to Newquay branch came into this category despite the fact that, even in winter, it was reckoned that 600 passengers made return journeys daily, and that the line carried a total in excess of 250,000 annually. The economics of operation were considered to be the key factor and receipts only covered about two-thirds of the annual expenditure of £38,000 Economies were made, one being to make Mr. Badcock, the stationmaster at Shepherds, redundant and pass control to the stationmaster at Perranporth, but income never quite matched expenditure. The line always remained “rural” and, in winter, it was part of the guard‘s duty to set up and light the oil lamps at the halts before it became dark and then, on the last train of the day, to switch them off and put them on board the train.

Excerpts from the book on St Newlyn East & Surrounding area.

The following video is entitled “The Perranporth Railway Steam Train Murder”

Cocks Hill & Bolingey:

Perranwell:

Goonhavern Halt:

Shepherds Station:

Miscellaneous locations

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows various miscellaneous properties and items within the village over the years.

Cornerways:

Cornerways was situated on the crossroads in Goonhavern opposite Winnie Grigg’s shop. When the road was widened in the early 1970’s both Cornerways and Winnie Grigg’s shop were demolished. Today there is a bungalow on the site of Cornerways but it is set well back from the road and is smaller than the original.

Carnkief, Wheal Anna & Wheal Francis scenes:

Goonhavern Bible Christian – Methodist Chapel:

The Methodist (Bible Christian) Chapel (a listed building) was built in 1876 the same year as the Goonhavern School. The Sunday School was built in the 1860’s and was used as a Chapel until the main building was built. The last service to be held in the Chapel was on Sunday 15th October 2006.

Goonhavern Community Hall:

The Goonhavern Community Hall was built between 1950 & 1954. The land was purchased in about 1950 from Miss Lizzie Knight of Perranporth and the hall built by voluntary contributions opened in 1953, improvements were carried out in the 1960’s when the entrance was built on to the exterior instead of being inside the hall and the concrete floor was replaced with “wayrock”. The Hall celebrated 60 years in 2014.

Goonhavern Garden Centre:

Goonhavern Industrial Estate:

Goonhavern Snooker Club:

Goonhavern Institute was built for the community back in 1926 and has an engraved stone in the front wall dedicated to Mr William Henry Eplett. The front original building was built in 1926 and had an open hearth with a three quarter size snooker table before two extensions were added in later years.

Goonhavern Village scenes:

Near Halt Lane – Goonhavern Industrial Estate:

Public Conveniences:

The Public Conveniences were built at the Bridge Road entrance to Goonhavern Park some time after the park opened.

Reen Cross Farm:

Trebarthen Terrace:

On the 16th October 2006 a Lightning strike caused extensive damage to No3 & No4 Trebarthen Terrace.

World in Miniature:

Memorials:

Goonhavern Post Office; Goonhavern Stores & Bridge Stores

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of Goonhavern Post Office at the three different locations in the village over a hundred plus years; Goonhavern Stores (now demolished) & Bridge Stores.

Goonhavern Ye Olde Shoppe as the wording said over the shop entrance started (Mr Bill Chandler put the wording up in late 1965 or early 1966) life as a Stores in about 1892 with Mr & Mrs John Ford. John Ford had traveled all over the UK as a Mine Captain but returned to Goonhavern to retire from that life. Unfortunately he passed away in 1904 with a young family leaving Mrs Mary (Granny) Ford to run the business. By 1910 the Shop incorporated a Post Office. It continued as such until 1942 when Granny Ford died and widow Hilda Stephens her daughter moved the Post Office down the road to the property built by her husband Charlie Stephens “Charlens” in about 1943.

Goonhavern Ye Olde Shoppe now became the property of Oscar & Winnie Grigg (brother & sister) and they ran the shop as a shop only until mid 1960’s when after their death Mr & Mrs Reg & Betty Chandler bought the shop. This they ran until Easter 1971 when it was compulsory purchased by the council, so it could be demolished for a road widening project in 1971/72.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Once Widow Granny Ford died her daughter Hilda sold the shop to the Grigg’s and  a widow herself moved the Post Office to the other side of the road to the house (Charlens) built by her late husband Charles Stephens.

“Charlens” now a Post Office in 1943 remained a Post Office and Sorting Office with five postmen, inc one a lady (who used to cycle her round) covering Callestick, Penhallow, Ventongimps, Perranwell, Rose, Wheal Hope & Goonhavern.

Hilda Stephens lived there with her daughter Mary McCameron a widow and her grandson  Chester McCameron. Both Hilda & Mary ran the Post Office, until 1953, when Mary remarried. Mary & Joe Brooks moved down to Avalon just down the road and had a son.

In 1959 Hilda Stephens retired and moved down to Avalon with Mary’s first son Chester McCameron, and Mary, Joe & young Derek moved up to run and live in the Post Office. Hilda tragically died in 1961.

Mary again became a widow in 1965, and soon married Henry Rodda, who briefly incorporated a Butchers Shop within the Post Office building. This was the late 1960’s early 1970’s.  In 1978 Mary Rodda retired on ill health, and both stayed living in the village.

The Post Office was now taken over by Welshman Mr Jones. Not a friendly chap, perhaps his disability did not help his mood.

Finally Jim Gilbert took over from Mr Jones, and lived there until he retired in 2005 on ill health, and the building reverted back to a dwelling.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Bridge Stores:

Mr & Mrs Reg Chandler moved to a new premises built on the entrance to Carriage Parc (what was once the Railway cutting – the old railway bridge stonework can be seen by the verge on the edge of the car park into the park) on Bridge Road at Easter in 1971 after their Stores on the main road (ex Granny Ford-Winnie Grigg’s) was demolished by Cornwall County Council Highways.

After Betty Chandler various new owners took over the Stores only keeping it for a short time.

These owners were Barry and Beryl Oakley, Dennis and Pam Shepherd, Roy and Joan Stratton (-1987), Bob & Janice Kemp (1987-1995), David & Jean Allsop (1995-2001) and Peter & Maria Gartan (2001-2008).

In November 2006 under Peter & Maria Gartan it became a Stores and Post Office with the closure of the previous Post Office at “Charlens” when Mr Jim Gilbert retired. However it was short lived as by 2008 the Stores & Post Office ceased trading at a great loss to the village.

Luckily it was a brief closure, as on 30th March 2010 it reopened under the ownership of the “White family” Susan (Sue), Husband Ashley & Daughters Claire (now a Tonkin) & Michelle.

On 4th May 2010 the Village Post Office returned to the stores. Since then the business has thrived. In August 2013 work started on an extension of the Store and Post Office, and by the end of January 2014 the work was completed enlarging the store by at least a third to cater for increased business. It is now modern, spacious and well laid out. A new store room is being built in August 2016.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Churchtown Farm – Kernewek Restaurant/Pottery – Park View/Pottery Mews

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of Churchtown Farm – Kernewek Cottage Restaurant – Kernewek Pottery – Pottery Mews/Park View.

Back in my youth during the 1960’s there was a farm called Churchtown Farm once owned by Mr Joe Nicholls in the centre of our village, hard to visualise today.

Mr Nicholls kept a number of “North Devon cattle”. Mr Nicholls passed away in 1965, and some time afterwards the Farmhouse was converted into a Restaurant (The Kernewek Cottage Restaurant) but the outbuildings remained on site.

After a few years this closed and the Restaurant was converted into a dwelling. Mr & Mrs Reg Foster moved there, and built Fosters Pottery. The outbuildings still remained. There were other brothers that owned separate Fosters Potteries, one at Scorrier and one in Redruth.

In 1995 a fire in the Kiln Building destroyed the potteries ability to make pottery on site and it was then solely used as a Pottery Factory Shop. Eventually closing down completely in 2005.

Mr Foster then started a housing development on the site including the outbuildings which were also converted. The development took a number of years to complete, the old Kiln building gone by 2009,  and the last dwelling built in 2014. This site is now known as Potters Mews and Park View.

©2016 Derek Brooks

Goonhavern – Individuals of the Past

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows just some of the many Individual Characters of the Village of Goonhavern over the past hundred and fifty years .

Earlier than 1900

Period 1900-1909

Period 1910-1919

Period 1920-1929

Period 1930-1939

Period 1940-1949

Period 1950-1959

Listen to a track played by Goonhavern Banjo Band.

Listen to a vocal track by Glen Pedlar singing with Goonhavern Banjo Band accompanied by his Daughter Carol.

Listen to Rita Jacka playing a Banjo solo.

Period 1960-1969

Period 1970-1979

Period 1980-1989

Period 1990-1999

Period 2000-2009

Period 2010 – 2019

Period 2020 –

Goonhavern C.P.School

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of Goonhavern County Primary School over 140 years (1876-2016).

Goonhavern County Primary School opened on the 17th October 1876 and its first Headmaster was Mr William Tresidder who lived at the School House with his wife and young family. William was born in Feock but married a local girl Elizabeth Trebilcock and raised a family. Mr William Tresidder was Headmaster until he retired on April 20th 1916 after 40 years at the age of 65 years. During this period his son John and daughters Olga and Martha were also teachers at the school.

After Mr William Tresidder retired Mr Hugh Peters took over on 1st May 1916. His tenure was cut short as on the 15th July 1916 he left to join His Majesty’s Forces in the 11th Pioneer Battalion during World War 1.

On September 11th 1916 Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast took over as a temporary headmaster, the position made permanent in 1919. Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast, his wife Ada and only son Leslie lived at the School House. Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast was Headmaster until he retired at the age of 60 years on 5th January 1941.

After Mr Matthew Hoskin Keast retired Mr Leslie Crabb took over as Headmaster on 6th January 1941. Mr Crabb was appointed as a teacher in May 1930, before leaving on 31st December 1932 to be appointed Headmaster at St Gennys Bude. Mr Leslie Crabb, his wife Doreen also a teacher and children Angela & David lived at the School House. Mr Leslie Crabb stayed until leaving suddenly under a cloud on 1st May 1950.

On 2nd May 1950 a Mr C Iveson (Supply Teacher) took over as the temporary Headmaster until a new one was appointed.

Mr William (Bill) Curnow started as Headmaster on 7th September 1950, with his wife working in the office. Mr William Curnow, his wife and daughter Marilyn lived at the School House. Mr & Mrs Curnow retired in July 1974 and they moved to a bungalow on the Reen Cross Road, Goonhavern until his death.

In September 1974 popular Mr Tom Delbridge took over as Headmaster and carried on till his retirement in July 1993. Mr Delbridge was instrumental in organizing the School Sports Day and School Fete, which on those days you could hear his voice booming out across the village with his PA System.

After Mr Tom Delbridge retired Mr Roger Arend arrived in September 1993 and saw a modernisation of the school between 2000-2003, something that had been talked about for 25 years before.

In 2000 major works commenced over a four year period to upgrade the school and completely refurbish the school inside and out with additional permanent buildings being built to replace the old Elliott Classrooms that had been there for nearly 50 years. Mr Arend left in December 2008.

After Mr Arend was Mr Craig Hayes who started at Goonhavern in January 2009 and finished in July 2017.

The latest Headmaster Mr Mark Lloyd  started in September 2017.

©2018 Derek Brooks

Photographs of Rejerrah Village, Surrounding Hamlets and its Residents

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows just some of the many Places and Individual Characters of the Village of Rejerrah over the past hundred and fifty years .

Rose Village, Surrounding Hamlets & its Residents

Please note you can post a comment to any image, and it will be monitored and added if verified. If you type in a comment you must go to the bottom of that specific page and verify the post by doing a quick image test. This proves you are an actual person and not a hacker remotely automatically “spamming the site”. Thank you.

This page shows the history of Rose Village, Surrounding Hamlets and its Residents over the years.

Unfortunately the quality of the scanned images are not as I would like as they were not taken from the original photographs. If anyone has a copy of the photographs on this page and could email mail me a copy I will credit you, and replace my copy.

Rose is a small village with a very small population. It is in between Goonhavern and Perranporth. The people of the village get together and write a newsletter. There is a committee to arrange various activities for the local folk. They have an A.G.M. once a year. The Men’s Institute hold a Fun Nite each year. This year they had a genuine home-made pasty section on their “Home Produce” stall. There was a baking day for the ladies. There is also a Sunday School for the children with a different theme each week. In the chapel they have concerts in the evenings as well as regular services. They write all sorts of news in the newsletter which is monthly. For instance if someone leaves the village they mention it (eg. joining the Army). Even a cuckcoo in a nest can get a mention!

Rose Post Office is owned by Mrs Partridge.She does family allowances,  bills, pensions, stamps and kodak prints. The P.O.is small. She runs it on her own. If anyone came to steal anything they would find it difficult because she has got a very vicious dog. Just the locals use this P.O. Originally it was joined to the shop down the road. Her father had it before her. It has had three moves. At one time it was in her mother’s kitchen and now it is in the old coal house. A bell rings in the kitchen when someone comes. She likes working in the P.O. because its not very busy. She has been working there about 14 years. £35.80 is the basic pension but not many people have that now. A married person gets £21.50. There is a much larger P.O. in Perranporth. Sadly, a lot of small village P.O.’s have had to close.

Article Courtesy of the BBC Domesday Reloaded Project written in 1986.